2 days in Province of Seville Itinerary

2 days in Province of Seville Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Province of Seville Trip Planner

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Seville
— 1 night
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Seville

— 1 night

City of Towers

A city of rich Moorish heritage, Seville is the cultural and financial center of southern Spain, and the site of numerous festivals throughout the year.
Kick off your visit on the 28th (Sat): stroll around Parque de Maria Luisa, get to know the fascinating history of Barrio Santa Cruz, and then admire the striking features of Setas de Sevilla (Metropol Parasol). Keep things going the next day: contemplate the long history of Royal Alcázar of Seville, don't miss a visit to Torre del Oro, admire the landmark architecture of Plaza de España, take in nature's colorful creations at Casa de Pilatos, then take in panoramic vistas at Torre Giralda, and finally pause for some serene contemplation at Catedral de Sevilla.

To see more things to do, traveler tips, and tourist information, go to the Seville trip itinerary planning tool.

Barcelona to Seville is an approximately 3.5-hour flight. You can also take a train; or drive. Expect a daytime high around 17°C in January, and nighttime lows around 7°C. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 29th (Sun) early enough to fly back home.

Things to do in Seville

Historic Sites · Parks · Neighborhoods
Find places to stay Jan 27 — 29:

Province of Seville travel guide

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Architectural Buildings · Historic Sites · Churches
Relatively few tourists venture beyond the urban tourist attractions of the Province of Seville, thus missing the charms of a region noted for its imposing religious buildings and countryside of dense oak forests. It’s also home to culinary treats rare anywhere else in the world, including cured sausages and aniseed liquor. The Guadalquivir, one of Spain’s most important rivers, dominates the region’s landscape, creating a fertile valley filled with an endless patchwork of colorful wheat fields and olive groves. Much of this land was once in the hands of a few very wealthy landowners. Today the area remains divided up into large farm estates and thriving towns abundant with places to visit, such as ornate palaces, medieval cathedrals, and modern flamenco clubs.